Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Shuriken no Jutsu

In my study of the Shuriken, I have reevaluated its potential and reestablished its category among the heavy weaponry and projectile support. With minor implementations of hand made parts (which I have determined will remain under Controlled Information), the smaller shuriken was able to penetrate metal car doors. In the same testing, the small to medium sized test pieces were able to withstand a longer flight than that of an arrow... the shurikens are much more simpler to manufacture than the conventional arrow bolts.

...in the heavy shuriken category, the study performed utilized a modified sling MS (also referred to as the modified fishing line MFL), a simple attachment accurately released the shuriken. In the same testing, the heavy shurikens' range of trajectory almost double a football field. In short range applications, the heavy shurikens/MS provided an accurate hand-operated projectile that has a helmet piercing capability.

The consistency of performance for both weapons presented a potential for acquiring an ideal accuracy that would render them viable methods - training provided. Please be advised that the shuriken has the possibility of back-firing (when saddling is done improperly). A high level of caution is to be issued in the testing of these weapons. antonio lamotta

What is Kenjutsu

 Kenjutsu techniques can be compared to the strategies of warfare, while batto-jutsu or kendo can be compared to shooting range techniques.

As in the Book of Five Rings, by Miyamoto Musashi, a kenjutsuist relies on the conditions of the ground, light source, as well as the opponents' capabilities, before implementing a practical attack. The attack is not set on any particular weapon or move to capitulate, nor is there a predisposed target or trajectory. Any exposed part of the opponents body is a possible target (as in Musashi's "Injuring the Corners").

To be effective, a kenjutsu strike/or counter-strike is a composition of several techniques: feigning, cutting, jabbing, thrusting, parrying or binding, footwork, choice of weapon, and even knowing the opponents weapon. It was mentioned that once Musashi realized the physics of the chain-and-sickle (kusarigama) he was then able to defeat it.

The feigning techniques are effective movements of the weapon, footwork, center of gravity, and even the use of kiai. Applied effectively, the opponent is set-back one move, while creating an opening elsewhere. The feigning technique should be angled to allow a quick direct shot from this position. Only sufficient practice will perfect these techniques and teaching to convey the training of proper reflexes.

There is not much time to think during a skirmish or battle. A fluent continuation of techniques must be deployed to manage even multiple opponents. One second per opponent is too long. Managing an army should be treated the same way.

A practical understanding of the body and weapon is necessary to be able to dispatch a strike or counter strike whether standing, walking, or rolling around the ground (or whether an army is attacking or retreating). There is no time-out or ready position. It might be a fight under minimum visibility or total darkness. When striking range is reached, reflexes dictate the outcome.

Cutting, jabbing, and thrusting techniques must be all preceded by a feint. The defender can easily parry a strong attack, due to the telegraphing momentum behind the attacker's weapon. Therefore, a strong cutting technique can easily receive a deadly cut across the sword hand or forearm. The feigning movement should complement both double-sword, two-handed sword, or any weapon.

There are some strikes that do not require a preceding subterfuge. These are referred to as "quick strikes". They are done with two hands on the sword or with a sword in each hand. One hand is at the base of the tsuka (to provide longer reach) and the other hand is at the ridge of the blade to provide the initial force to flick the sword as quick as an arrow to hit the target. This could be done with the double sword, with one sword providing the push for the dispatch.

These postures are hidden and the ready positions are implemented while switching hands or while changing steps. These flicking strikes can be administered from any angle (top, sides or below).
When parrying, always try to direct the point of the sword to the target. This minimizes the step needed to be able to counter-attack. Thus the opponent is at an immediate disadvantage. Also, using the quick strike at the opponent's sword hand or forearm will immediately incapacitate his attack before having to parry it. A simple rule — to keep the point of the sword pointed to the opponent or at within the area of the gate, while attempting to parry in all angles — will provide a good foundation for appropriate counter-maneuver reflexes.

Musashi said that the footwork shall be adapted to terrain and purpose. The correct stride is to be applied to whatever leverage is needed to effectively wield the weapon at hand. The choice of weapon and knowing the opponents' weapons is essential for the choice of right technique and strategy. Knowing the center of gravity of a weapon can help the assessment of its maneuverability and speed, as much as its effects on leverage and kinetic forces.

The use of the double-sword (one in each hand) can provide the ultimate control of the gate. The "gate", as referred to by Miyamoto Musashi, is the opening between two fighters. All attacks must go through this gate to reach the target from any angle. To close or disrupt the gate at the right moment is necessary to deflect incoming attacks. The double swords' ability to alternate and complement their trajectories provides a strong continuous flowing barricade as well as trapping and striking repetitions. Timing is essential in the use of this technique, and Musashi advised that the double-sword technique should be learned early on.

In the later stages of kenjutsu, one can win without the use of a blade by merely understanding the physics of sword work. A kenjutsuist can resolve or win without having to fight (or without having to cut) — and gain followers instead. There is no individual or religion that started this. Any level-headed person would not want to maim or kill another human being. A kenjutsuist (a true swordsman) strives to attain well beyond cutting techniques: to serve his master or act on his own as a diplomat of fairness in the living hell.

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